Human Tissue Sample Blog

How to Culture Cryopreserved Samples

Posted by Luke Doiron on Feb 2, 2016 8:00:00 AM

    

Cryopreservation is widely used for stabilizing and storing biological materials such as tissue specimens at very low (cryogenic) temperatures. Advancements in understanding the best methods for cryopreservation, thawing and culturing of biological specimens have enabled such samples to be stored for many years and still be viable specimens for studying a variety of cellular processes.

Determining the best method for culture of thawed cryopreserved samples is an important step in many research protocols. Depending on the research goal and tissue specimen, culture methods will vary to some degree. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), whole tumor tissue, and bone marrow are just a few examples of the cryopreserved samples that scientists use for culturing.

One important point repeatedly mentioned in the literature is that cryopreservation must be done correctly. Tissue samples should be frozen in 10% DMSO, never snap frozen, without temperature fluctuation during storage time. In particular, specimens should remain below the glass transition point to maximize long-term utility.

The following culture protocols have been used for cryopreserved samples.

Read More

Beyond the Basics: 14 Components of Normal Bone Marrow You Might Have Missed

Posted by Luke Doiron on Jan 20, 2015 6:00:00 AM

    

 

The normal bone marrow is the sole site of effective hematopoiesis in humans, and occurs in the soft, spongy, gelatinous tissue found in the hollow spaces in the interior of bones.The average weight of this tissue is about 4% of the total body weight, or 2.6 kg in an adult weighing 65 kg. It consists of stem cells, which are large, "primitive," undifferentiated cells supported by fibrous tissue called stroma.

Read More

3 Key Benefits of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells

Posted by Luke Doiron on Jan 6, 2015 6:00:00 AM

    

 

Human bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) are isolated from whole bone marrow, and contain a diverse cell population, including lymphocytes, monocytes, mesenchymal stem cells and hematopoietic progenitor cells. BMMCs are invaluable for researchers studying the genetic and molecular basis for diseases.

Read More

The Many Uses of Normal Bone Marrow Tissue

Posted by Luke Doiron on Dec 30, 2014 6:00:00 AM

    

 

In a healthy individual, the bone marrow space is largely occupied by hematopoietic cells and adipocytes, whereas the stromal cells and extracellular matrix claim a very small space. Maturation of hematopoietic cells is a complex, but orderly process that takes place in the bone marrow “microenvironment.” This involves cell-to-cell interaction, specific growth hormones and various proteins called cytokines. The unique niche of the bone marrow microenvironment makes for a rich source of tissue for scientists to perform important research.

Read More

Differences between Red and Yellow Marrow

Posted by Luke Doiron on Dec 16, 2014 6:00:00 AM

    

Read More

5 Uses of Normal Bone Marrow in Biomarker Identification and Validation

Posted by Luke Doiron on Dec 9, 2014 6:00:00 AM

    

 

TheNational Institute of Health (NIH) defines a biomarker as, “a characteristic that is objectively measured and evaluated as an indication of normal biologic processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacologic responses to a therapeutic intervention.” Many researchers rely on biomarkers to help them understand the ways in which cells act, based on the protein markers found on the cell surface.

Read More

4 Benefits of Bone Marrow for Lupus Treatment Research

Posted by Luke Doiron on Jul 29, 2014 6:00:00 AM

    

Human bone marrow serves as the factory for developing mesenchymal stem cells, as well as the birthplace of the human immune system. Because so many cell progenitors are located in the marrow, it is an invaluable tool that can help researchers learn more about the sources of blood and autoimmune disorders.

Read More

5 Applications of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells (BMMCs)

Posted by Luke Doiron on Jul 15, 2014 8:22:00 AM

    

Human bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) are isolated from whole bone marrow, and contain a diverse cell population, including lymphocytes, monocytes, mesenchymal stem cells and hematopoietic progenitor cells. BMMCs are invaluable for researchers studying the genetic and molecular basis for challenging diseases such as cancer. In 2010, the Centers for Disease Control reported that cancer was the second leading cause of death in the United States. Finding better cancer treatments with fewer side effects continues to be a primary focus for researchers around the world. To accomplish this, the availability of high-quality human bone marrow mononuclear cells is critical so that novel drug therapies can move from development to market more rapidly.

Read More

Subscribe to the Conversant Bio blog

New Call-to-action